Stormwater Project - Rodney Dormitory Site


Stormwater Project Header 

About the Project

The City of Newark is interested in developing the Caesar Rodney Residence Hall Complex located at 103 Hillside Road, which closed in the spring of 2015.The City is under contract to purchase the property and has proposed a plan for development of the site, which will integrate a state of the art stormwater management facility along with recreational and educational components. 

The City implemented a robust public participation program to reimagine the site and make the final product something residents of and visitors to Newark will proudly utilize for years to come. The public participation included three workshops held over several months in fall 2017 to collaborate on the design and amenities of the new site. All materials from those workshops are posted below. 

Following the public participation program, a final concept was presented to Council on December 11, 2017. By incorporating input from the public, elected officials, and City staff, the final plan includes a combination of items balancing community recreation, infrastructure, and stormwater needs. Integration with the surroundings, existing conditions, and consideration of environmental and natural resources are also included in the final design. The City has been approved to utilize State Revolving Loan Funds through the referendum process, which was completed June 2018, for the purchase and development of the site.

Rodney Tree Evaluation

The City of Newark International Society of Arboriculture (ISA) Certified Staff member evaluated all the trees in the park area. Their evaluation is based on the draft plan of the project and was completed on March 19.

The trees marked with a white dot are considered healthy trees although they will need dead wooding and pruning. The trees that are marked with an X have some structural flaws or will be compromised due to the proposed park plans for the sight. Not all of the trees marked with an X have to be removed, pending the results of the Tree Risk Assessment Study which will be conducted by an independent ISA Arborist.

  • Sweet Gum - Has girdling roots with several large broken branch stubs throughout the crown of the tree. The crown also has the early stages of decline and is beginning to be seen throughout the tree. Due to the new path location, there is potential the root structure will be damaged.
  • Sweet Gum - The root flare is buried. When removal of existing curb line and road, there is potential the root structure will be damaged.
  • Sweet Gum – When removal of the existing curb line and road, there is potential the root structure will be damaged.
  • Sweet Gum - The crown also has the early stages of decline and is beginning to be seen throughout the tree. The root flare is buried.
  • Sweet Gum - The crown also has the early stages of decline and is beginning to be seen throughout the tree. The root flare is buried.
  • Maple – Declining in health, one lead is in severe decline.
  • Sweet Gum – Large cavity at the base of the tree. The tree in its existing condition is an extreme liability and needs to be removed.
  • Sweet Gum - Due to the removal of the existing curb and road and the installation of the new proposed path the tree will lose over 50% of its root structure.
  • Sweet Gum - Due to the removal of the existing curb and road and the installation of the new proposed path the tree will lose over 50% of its root structure.
  • Persimmon – This tree is very sensitive to changes in grade and has damage from mowers hitting it. Due to the removal of the existing curb and road and the installation of the new proposed path the tree will lose a portion of its root structure.
  • Sweet Gum - The root flare is buried.
  • Honey Locust – Located in the proposed concrete walk.
  • Oak – Has girdling root issue on the backside of the tree and is in the playground area that will have safety surface installed.
  • Oak – The tree is in good condition however, when the removal of the existing hard surface areas around the tree occur concern for root damage. If the hard surface is removed with extreme care, the tree could potentially be saved. We will reevaluate the root system after the hard surface is removed.
  • Sweet Gum - The tree is in good condition however, when the removal of the existing hard surface areas around the tree occur concern for root damage. If the hard surface is removed with extreme care, the tree could potentially be saved. We will reevaluate the root system after the hard surface is removed.
  • Oak – The tree is in good condition however, when the removal of the existing hard surface areas around the tree occur concern for root damage. If the hard surface is removed with extreme care, the tree could potentially be saved. We will reevaluate the root system after the hard surface is removed.
  • Oak – The tree needs to be removed due to the grade of the area increasing and burying the root flare and root structure.
  • Oak – The tree is in good condition however, due to the proposed location of the new walkway approximately 50% of the root structure could be compromised.
  • Oak – The tree is in good condition however, due to the proposed location of the new walkway approximately 50% of the root structure could be compromised.
  • Maple (Boxelder) – The tree is in severe decline and needs to be removed.
  • Honey Locust – Root damage to the tree and half of the crown has been removed due to hard pruning as a result of the overhead power line. The tree needs to be removed.

Explanation of terms:

Root Flare Buried - The Root Flare is an area where a vital gas/air exchange occurs, when it is buried it affects the health of the tree.

Girdling Roots - A tree is girdled when the root is tightly wrapped around the trunk or stem. A stem girdling root circles or partially circles the base of a tree at or just below the soil surface. Girdling Roots choke off the flow of water and nutrients between the roots and branches and food produced in the leaves from reaching the roots. They can also compress and weaken the trunk of a tree at or above the root collar flare (the junction between the trunk and the main roots) causing it to lean and lose its stability. Trees having stem girdling roots suffer a slow decline in health and eventually a premature death of the tree.

For a mapped landscape plan, please click here .

Brownfield Program

The city has entered into a Brownfield Development Agreement (BDA) to help fund the mitigation of hazardous material from the site. Environmental remediation began in December 2018.  For complete information, please click here.

2018 Capital Project Referendum

Funding for this project was subject to the 2018 capital referendum.  For more information, please click here.

Please click here to submit a question or comment about the project – we look forward to hearing from you!

Public Workshop #3 - Presentation of the Preferred Concept for the New Site and Next Steps
Wednesday, November 8, 2017 6 – 8 p.m., City Hall  Please see below for materials from this meeting. 
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Preferred-concept-plan

concept-feedback-survey

Public Workshop #2 - Presentation of Concepts for the New Site
Thursday, September 28, 2017, from 6 – 8 p.m., City Hall  Please see below for materials from this meeting.  
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Presentation updated Oct 2, 2017

Public Workshop #1 - What Do You Want to See on the New Site?
Tuesday, July 25, 2017, from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m., City Hall  Please see below for materials from this meeting.  
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 Agenda/Fact Sheet - Workshop #1
 DocumentsDate 
Environmental Remediation ContractOctober 26, 2018
Presentation to CouncilDecember 11, 2017
PCB, Asbestos Abatement and Air Monitoring SummaryJune 13, 2017
WRA PresentationApril 10, 2017
JMT PresentationApril 10, 2017
AECOM PresentationApril 10, 2017
Rodney Presentation to CouncilMarch 10, 2017
Purchase and Sale Agreement - Rodney Dormitory Parcel for Primary Development of a Stormwater FacilityMarch 10, 2017
Environmental Reports Phase IIMarch 8, 2017
Environmental Reports Phase IMarch 8, 2017
Rodney Complex PresentationFebruary 27, 2017
University of Delaware - Rodney and Dickinson - Highest and Best Use AppraisalFebruary 24, 2017
Potential for Stormwater Improvements and Public Open SpaceFebruary 24, 2017
City of Newark - Appraisal Rodney and Dickinson PropertiesFebruary 24, 2017
DRAFT timeline for Project - Subject to ChangeFebruary 24, 2017

 Public Workshop #2 - Presentation of Concepts for the New Site
 Thursday, September 28, 2017, from 6 – 8 p.m., City Hall
 
 

 Public Workshop #2 - Presentation of Concepts for the New Site
 Thursday, September 28, 2017, from 6 – 8 p.m., City Hall
 
 

 Public Workshop #2 - Presentation of Concepts for the New Site
 Thursday, September 28, 2017, from 6 – 8 p.m., City Hall